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Asclepias Seeds



Asclepias perennis | White Aquatic Milkweed


Here I am offering Seeds from Asclepias perennis, also known as Aquatic Milkweed, and White Milkweed. Growing to about 2 feet high, this plant must live in full sun where it blooms repeatedly throughout the year. This plant like the other milkweeds is a very useful plant for the birds, bees, and butterflies. Monarchs love this plant and use it as a larval host plant. It is also the larval host plant for the Queen and Soldier butterflies. USDA Hardiness Zones 6 to 9

Asclepias perennis White Aquatic Milkweed

Asclepias perennis White Aquatic Milkweed

Asclepias perennis White Aquatic Milkweed

Asclepias perennis White Aquatic Milkweed
Asclepias perennis | White Aquatic Milkweed

5 Available Now

Here I am offering Seeds from Asclepias perennis, also known as Aquatic Milkweed, and White Milkweed. Growing to about 2 feet high, this plant must live in full sun where it blooms repeatedly throughout the year. This plant like the other milkweeds is a very useful plant for the birds, bees, and butterflies. Monarchs love this plant and use it as a larval host plant. It is also the larval host plant for the Queen and Soldier butterflies. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 6 to 9








Asclepias pumila | Low Milkweed | Plains Milk Weed


Here I am offering Seeds from Asclepias pumila, also known as Low Milkweed, and Plains Milkweed. This highly versatile plant is edible and the fiber is very useful in making cloth, string, paper, oil, wicks, gum, latex and stuffing. Growing to just over a foot high, this plant blooms from July to August. It likes to be planted in full sun or partial shade, and in well draining soil. Unripened flower buds can be cooked and eaten. The taste is similar to peas. The flower clusters can be boiled down to make a sugary sweetener, or they can be used as a thickener and flavoring in soups. Young shoots can be cooked and used as an asparagus substitute, while tips of older shoots are cooked and used as a substitute for spinach. Young seed pods are very tasty and older shoots can be eaten after the floss is removed. The fibers are very water repellent and therefore they are used to stuff life jackets. Not only is this a larval host plant for the Monarch, Queen, and Soldier Butterflies, but it is a nectar source for many other beneficial pollinators. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 5 to 9

Asclepias pumila Low Milkweed Plains Milk Weed

Asclepias pumila Low Milkweed Plains Milk Weed

Asclepias pumila Low Milkweed Plains Milk Weed

Asclepias pumila Low Milkweed Plains Milk Weed
Asclepias pumila | Low Milkweed | Plains Milk Weed

3 Available Now

Here I am offering Seeds from Asclepias pumila, also known as Low Milkweed, and Plains Milkweed. This highly versatile plant is edible and the fiber is very useful in making cloth, string, paper, oil, wicks, gum, latex and stuffing. Growing to just over a foot high, this plant blooms from July to August. It likes to be planted in full sun or partial shade, and in well draining soil. Unripened flower buds can be cooked and eaten. The taste is similar to peas. The flower clusters can be boiled down to make a sugary sweetener, or they can be used as a thickener and flavoring in soups. Young shoots can be cooked and used as an asparagus substitute, while tips of older shoots are cooked and used as a substitute for spinach. Young seed pods are very tasty and older pods can be eaten after the floss is removed. The fibers are very water repellent and therefore they are used to stuff life jackets. Not only is this a larval host plant for the Monarch, Queen, and Soldier Butterflies, but it is a nectar source for many other beneficial pollinators. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 5 to 9








Asclepias purpurascens | Purple Milkweed


Here I am offering Seeds from Asclepias purpurascens, also known as Purple Milkweed. This Rare milkweed plant does not aggressively spread out like most other Asclepias plants do, and it is considered an Endangered plant in several States. It does not spread by shooting up rhizomes everywhere. Asclepias purpurascens is the most brilliant color of any of the milkweeds. The flowers start out pink and then turn into a dark purple. This perennial is a very popular plant with the birds, bees, and butterflies. This plant is deer resistant. I do not think that they like the milky liquid inside the stems. Not only is it a larval host plant for the Monarch Butterfly, but it is a nectar source for many beneficial pollinators. Growing to about 3 feet tall this plant likes to live in sun or partial shade where it blooms in the middle of the Summer. USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 9

Asclepias purpurascens Purple Milkweed

Asclepias purpurascens Purple Milkweed

Asclepias purpurascens Purple Milkweed

Asclepias purpurascens Purple Milkweed
Asclepias purpurascens | Purple Milkweed

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Here I am offering Seeds from Asclepias purpurascens, also known as Purple Milkweed. This Rare milkweed plant does not aggressively spread out like most other Asclepias plants do, and it is considered an Endangered plant in several States. It does not spread by shooting up rhizomes everywhere. Asclepias purpurascens is the most brilliant color of any of the milkweeds. The flowers start out pink and then turn into a dark purple. This perennial is a very popular plant with the birds, bees, and butterflies. This plant is deer resistant. I do not think that they like the milky liquid inside the stems. Not only is this a larval host plant for the Monarch, Queen, and Soldier Butterflies, but it is a nectar source for many other beneficial pollinators. Growing to about 3 feet tall this plant likes to live in sun or partial shade where it blooms in the middle of the Summer. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 9