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Asclepias syriaca | Milkweed | Butterfly Flower | Silkweed | 200_Seeds


This is Asclepias syriaca, also known as common milkweed, butterfly flower, silkweed, silky swallow wort, and Virginia silkweed. Help the Monarchs, and all of the other butterflies, and even the honey bees for that matter, by giving them what they need to survive, reproduce, and flourish. This is not only the best North American Monarch butterfly plant to have, it is also the best honey bee milkweed in the sense that it produces the highest yield of honey compared to the other milkweeds. This milkweed is a Perennial Herb that can grow up to about 9 feet tall, and it is a big hit with all of the birds, bees and butterflies. Asclepias syriaca is a mid Summer bloomer with bursts of rose and mauve colored flowers. This plant loves to live in full sun, but does fairly well in partial shade as well. This is the plant people generally think of when the term milkweed is used. It is somewhat historical in the sense that Asclepias syriaca was detailed in Cornuts 1635 work Canadensium Plantarum Historia, making it one of the earliest documented North American species. Not only is this a Host Plant for the Monarch Butterfly, but the butterflies and the larvae use glycosides from the plant to make themselves toxic to birds and other animals who might want to eat them. Asclepias syriaca is a long time larval host plant of the Monarch, Queen and Soldier butterflies. It is also the larval host of the Milkweed Tussock Moth. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and again the Milkweed Tussock moth. Among the many documented butterflies who use Asclepias syriaca as a nectar source are the American Lady, Black Swallowtail, Great Spangled Fritillary, Monarch, Painted Lady, Queen, Question Mark, Red Admiral, Red-spotted Purple, Zebra Swallowtail, Silver-spotted Skipper, Silvery Checkerspot, Spicebush Swallowtail, Variegated Fritillary, Viceroy, Banded Hairstreak, Delaware Skipper, Baltimore Checkerspot, Eastern Tailed-Blue, Fiery Skipper, Gray Hairstreak ,  Mourning Cloak,  Orange Sulphur,  Little Glassywing,  Zabulon Skipper, Southern Cloudywing, Hoary Edge, Lorquin Admiral, Pecks Skipper, Red-banded Hairstreak, Sachem, Spring Azure, Common Sootywing, Juniper Hairstreak, Eastern Pine Elfin, Hobomok Skipper, White-M Hairstreak, Atlantis Fritillary, Northern Cloudywing, Two-spotted Skipper, Dun Skipper, Hickory Hairstreak, Striped Hairstreak, Long Dash, Appalachian Tiger Swallowtail, Dion Skipper, Ottoe Skipper, Delaware Skipper, Ruddy Daggerwing, Baltimore Checkerspot, Diana Fritillary, Black Swallowtail, and Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterflies. The Nessus sphinx Moth is also known to nectar this plant. USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 9.
Asclepias syriaca | Milkweed | Butterfly Flower | Silkweed | 200_Seeds

95 Available Now

This is Asclepias syriaca, also known as common milkweed, butterfly flower, silkweed, silky swallow wort, and Virginia silkweed. Help the Monarchs, and all of the other butterflies, and even the honey bees for that matter, by giving them what they need to survive, reproduce, and flourish. This is not only the best North American Monarch butterfly plant to have, it is also the best honey bee milkweed in the sense that it produces the highest yield of honey compared to the other milkweeds. This milkweed is a Perennial Herb that can grow up to about 9 feet tall, and it is a big hit with all of the birds, bees and butterflies. Asclepias syriaca is a mid Summer bloomer with bursts of rose and mauve colored flowers. This plant loves to live in full sun, but does fairly well in partial shade as well. This is the plant people generally think of when the term milkweed is used. It is somewhat historical in the sense that Asclepias syriaca was detailed in Cornuts 1635 work Canadensium Plantarum Historia, making it one of the earliest documented North American species. Not only is this a Host Plant for the Monarch Butterfly, but the butterflies and the larvae use glycosides from the plant to make themselves toxic to birds and other animals who might want to eat them. Asclepias syriaca is a long time larval host plant of the Monarch, Queen and Soldier butterflies. It is also the larval host of the Milkweed Tussock Moth. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and again the Milkweed Tussock moth. Among the many documented butterflies who use Asclepias syriaca as a nectar source are the American Lady, Black Swallowtail, Great Spangled Fritillary, Monarch, Painted Lady, Queen, Question Mark, Red Admiral, Red-spotted Purple, Zebra Swallowtail, Silver-spotted Skipper, Silvery Checkerspot, Spicebush Swallowtail, Variegated Fritillary, Viceroy, Banded Hairstreak, Delaware Skipper, Baltimore Checkerspot, Eastern Tailed-Blue, Fiery Skipper, Gray Hairstreak , Mourning Cloak, Orange Sulphur, Little Glassywing, Zabulon Skipper, Southern Cloudywing, Hoary Edge, Lorquin Admiral, Pecks Skipper, Red-banded Hairstreak, Sachem, Spring Azure, Common Sootywing, Juniper Hairstreak, Eastern Pine Elfin, Hobomok Skipper, White-M Hairstreak, Atlantis Fritillary, Northern Cloudywing, Two-spotted Skipper, Dun Skipper, Hickory Hairstreak, Striped Hairstreak, Long Dash, Appalachian Tiger Swallowtail, Dion Skipper, Ottoe Skipper, Delaware Skipper, Ruddy Daggerwing, Baltimore Checkerspot, Diana Fritillary, Black Swallowtail, and Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterflies. The Nessus sphinx Moth is also known to nectar this plant. USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 9.
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Asclepias speciosa | Showy Milkweed | Greek Milkweed | 100_Seeds


This is Asclepias speciosa, also known as Greek Milkweed, and Showy Milkweed. This plant likes to live in the full sun where it attracts all sorts of bees, butterflies, and birds. This is a larval host plant of the Monarch butterfly. This perennial plant can get up to 6 feet high in good conditions, and sports gorgeous pink, rose and purple blossoms. This plant is less spreading and more manageable than most of the other milkweeds. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 9.
Asclepias speciosa | Showy Milkweed | Greek Milkweed | 100_Seeds

95 Available Now

This is Asclepias speciosa, also known as Greek Milkweed, and Showy Milkweed. This plant likes to live in the full sun where it attracts all sorts of bees, butterflies, and birds. This is a larval host plant of the Monarch butterfly. This perennial plant can get up to 6 feet high in good conditions, and sports gorgeous pink, rose and purple blossoms. This plant is less spreading and more manageable than most of the other milkweeds. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 9.
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Asclepias tuberosa | Butterfly MilkWeed | Pleurisy Root | 100_Seeds


This is Asclepias tuberosa, also known as Butterfly Milkweed, Butterfly Weed, and Pleurisy Root. Unlike many of the other milkweeds, this one prefers a dryer soil and must be planted in full sun. Another major difference between this plant and other milkweed is that this one does not have a milky sap. The orange and yellow blooms are out from mid Summer to early Fall. This milkweed attracts all kinds of wildlife, bringing in several different birds, bees, and butterflies. The hummingbirds are especially interested in this plant. This Plant is a Host Plant for the Monarch and the Queen butterflies. In places where there is no oleander Asclepias tuberosa is used as a larval host by the Polka-Dot Wasp Moth. It has been used as a larval host for the Cycnia collaris  and Unexpected Cycnia Moths. It attracts a whole assortment of butterflies as a nectar source. Documented nectar sources include the Gray Cooper, Banded Hairstreak, and Phaon Crescent butterflies. Common names include Canada Root, Chieger Flower, Chiggerflower, Fluxroot, Indian Paintbrush, Indian Posy, Orange Milkweed, Orange root, Orange Swallow wort, Silky Swallow wort, Tuber Root, Yellow Milkweed, White root, Windroot, Butterfly Love, and Butterflyweed. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 10.
Asclepias tuberosa | Butterfly MilkWeed | Pleurisy Root | 100_Seeds

90 Available Now

This is Asclepias tuberosa, also known as Butterfly Milkweed, Butterfly Weed, and Pleurisy Root. Unlike many of the other milkweeds, this one prefers a dryer soil and must be planted in full sun. Another major difference between this plant and other milkweed is that this one does not have a milky sap. The orange and yellow blooms are out from mid Summer to early Fall. This milkweed attracts all kinds of wildlife, bringing in several different birds, bees, and butterflies. The hummingbirds are especially interested in this plant. This Plant is a Host Plant for the Monarch and the Queen butterflies. In places where there is no oleander Asclepias tuberosa is used as a larval host by the Polka-Dot Wasp Moth. It has been used as a larval host for the Cycnia collaris and Unexpected Cycnia Moths. It attracts a whole assortment of butterflies as a nectar source. Documented nectar sources include the Gray Cooper, Banded Hairstreak, and Phaon Crescent butterflies. Common names include Canada Root, Chieger Flower, Chiggerflower, Fluxroot, Indian Paintbrush, Indian Posy, Orange Milkweed, Orange root, Orange Swallow wort, Silky Swallow wort, Tuber Root, Yellow Milkweed, White root, Windroot, Butterfly Love, and Butterflyweed. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 10.
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Asclepias arenaria | Sand Milkweed | 20_Seeds


This is Asclepias arenaria, also known as Sand Milkweed. Growing 3 feet tall this plant likes to live in full sun. This plant attracts bees, and butterflies, while it is resistant to deer. From late Spring to the middle of Summer this asclepia has light green blossoms. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 9.
Asclepias arenaria | Sand Milkweed | 20_Seeds

47 Available Now

This is Asclepias arenaria, also known as Sand Milkweed. Growing 3 feet tall this plant likes to live in full sun. This plant attracts bees, and butterflies, while it is resistant to deer. From late Spring to the middle of Summer this asclepia has light green blossoms. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 9.
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Asclepias viridis | Green Antelopehorn | Spider Milkweed | 10_Seeds


Here I am offering seeds from Asclepias viridis, also known as green milkweed, green antelopehorn, and spider milkweed. This low maintanance milkweed grows to about 2 feet tall in almost any soil. This plant likes to live in the full sun and blooms from late Spring into the middle of the Summer. Grow this one in the full sun where it will be a very popular plant with the bees, birds, and butterflies. It is a larval host plant of the Monarch butterfly. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 9.
Asclepias viridis | Green Antelopehorn | Spider Milkweed | 10_Seeds

44 Available Now

Here I am offering seeds from Asclepias viridis, also known as green milkweed, green antelopehorn, and spider milkweed. This low maintanance milkweed grows to about 2 feet tall in almost any soil. This plant likes to live in the full sun and blooms from late Spring into the middle of the Summer. Grow this one in the full sun where it will be a very popular plant with the bees, birds, and butterflies. It is a larval host plant of the Monarch butterfly. Asclepias in general are documented nectar sources for the Monarch, Orange-edged Roadside-Skipper, Dina Yellow, Carus Skipper, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, and Falcate Metalmark butterflies. It is also the nectar source for the Clarks sphinx, and Milkweed Tussock moths. USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 9.
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