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Perennial Seeds



Baptisia australis | Blue Wild Indigo | Rattleweed


Here I am offering Seeds from Baptisia australis, also known as False Indigo, Redneck Lupine, and Blue Wild Indigo. This perennial plant can get about 4 feet tall at the most. It likes to live in the full sun and will bloom from late Spring into the middle of the Summer. This is the larval host plant for the Orange Sulphur, the Clouded Sulphur, and the Eastern Tailed Blue butterflies. The Eastern Tailed Blue butterflies lay their eggs on the flower buds of the Baptisia australis and the caterpillars eat the flowers, bud, and seeds. It is also a nectar source for countless butterflies, bees and other insects. The Frosted Elfin butterfly Caterpillars eat the flowers and young seedpods of False Indigo; This is a rare and uncommon butterfly that you can lure into your garden with Baptisia australis. Another rare butterfly that can be coaxed into your garden is the Hoary Edge Skipper; Their eggs are laid in the flower buds and then the caterpillars eat the flowers and seedpods. The Wild Indigo Duskywing is also attracted to this plant. USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 10

Baptisia australis Blue Wild Indigo Rattleweed

Baptisia australis Blue Wild Indigo Rattleweed

Baptisia australis Blue Wild Indigo Rattleweed

Baptisia australis Blue Wild Indigo Rattleweed
Baptisia australis | Blue Wild Indigo | Rattleweed

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Here I am offering Seeds from Baptisia australis, also known as False Indigo, Redneck Lupine, and Blue Wild Indigo. This perennial plant can get about 4 feet tall at the most. It likes to live in the full sun and will bloom from late Spring into the middle of the Summer. This is the larval host plant for the Orange Sulphur, the Clouded Sulphur, and the Eastern Tailed Blue butterflies. The Eastern Tailed Blue butterflies lay their eggs on the flower buds of the Baptisia australis and the caterpillars eat the flowers, bud, and seeds. It is also a nectar source for countless butterflies, bees and other insects. The Frosted Elfin butterfly Caterpillars eat the flowers and young seedpods of False Indigo; This is a rare and uncommon butterfly that you can lure into your garden with Baptisia australis. Another rare butterfly that can be coaxed into your garden is the Hoary Edge Skipper; Their eggs are laid in the flower buds and then the caterpillars eat the flowers and seedpods. The Wild Indigo Duskywing is also attracted to this plant. USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 10








Baptisia bracteata | False-Indigo | Cream Wild Indigo


Here I am offering Seeds from Baptisia bracteata, also known as False Indigo, Longbract Wild Indigo, Plains Wild Indigo, and Cream Wild Indigo. When the Queen Bumblebee comes out of hibernation in late Spring she feeds on Baptisia bracteata. That is why this plant is so important to the bumblebee population. False Indigo has been known to live for decades, so over 20 years. Growing to about 2 feet high, this plant likes to live in the sun or partial shade. It blooms from late Spring until the middle of the Summer. This is also a larval host plant for the Wild Indigo Duskywing, and Hoary Edge butterflies. USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 9

Baptisia bracteata False Indigo Cream Wild Indigo

Baptisia bracteata False Indigo Cream Wild Indigo

Baptisia bracteata False Indigo Cream Wild Indigo

Baptisia bracteata False Indigo Cream Wild Indigo
Baptisia bracteata | False-Indigo | Cream Wild Indigo

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Here I am offering Seeds from Baptisia bracteata, also known as False Indigo, Longbract Wild Indigo, Plains Wild Indigo, and Cream Wild Indigo. When the Queen Bumblebee comes out of hibernation in late Spring she feeds on Baptisia bracteata. That is why this plant is so important to the bumblebee population. False Indigo has been known to live for decades, so over 20 years. Growing to about 2 feet high, this plant likes to live in the sun or partial shade. It blooms from late Spring until the middle of the Summer. This is also a larval host plant for the Wild Indigo Duskywing, and Hoary Edge butterflies. USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 9