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Shrub and Tree Seeds



Hibiscus sabdariffa | Roselle | Jamaican Tea | Maple Leaf Hibiscus


Here I am offering Seeds from Hibiscus sabdariffa, also known as Roselle, Jamaican Tea, Maple Leaf Hibiscus, Florida Cranberry, October Hibiscus, and Red Sorrell. This is really a quite amazing plant. They collect fibers from the inner bark to make burlap and rope, they use part of the blossom as a food coloring, the Senegalese, Burma, and other peoples use the leaves in their cooking as a spicy spinach, and in the Caribbean among other places they use this plat to make hibiscus drinks and hibiscus tea. These shrubs can get up to 6 feet high, and must have a place in the full sun. That is at least 6 hours of direct sunlight a day. They bloom in the middle of the Fall and stay strong until early Winter. Hibiscus plants in general are a nectar source for the Cloudless Sulphur, Orbed Sulphur, Disguised Scrub-Hairstreak, Yojoa Scrub-Hairstreak, Dukes Skipper, Large Orange Sulphur, White Angled-Sulphur, Yellow Angled-Sulphur, and Monk butterflies, and larval hosts for the Bumelia Webworm and Pearly Wood-nymph moths, and the Cloudless Sulphur butterfly.USDA Hardiness Zones 9b to 11

Hibiscus sabdariffa Roselle Jamaican Tea Maple Leaf Hibiscus

Hibiscus sabdariffa Roselle Jamaican Tea Maple Leaf Hibiscus

Hibiscus sabdariffa Roselle Jamaican Tea Maple Leaf Hibiscus

Hibiscus sabdariffa Roselle Jamaican Tea Maple Leaf Hibiscus
Hibiscus sabdariffa | Roselle | Jamaican Tea | Maple Leaf Hibiscus

17 Available Now

Here I am offering Seeds from Hibiscus sabdariffa, also known as Roselle, Jamaican Tea, Maple Leaf Hibiscus, Florida Cranberry, October Hibiscus, and Red Sorrell. This is really a quite amazing plant. They collect fibers from the inner bark to make burlap and rope, they use part of the blossom as a food coloring, the Senegalese, Burma, and other peoples use the leaves in their cooking as a spicy spinach, and in the Caribbean among other places they use this plant to make hibiscus drinks and teas. These shrubs can get up to 6 feet high, and must have a place in the full sun. That is at least 6 hours of direct sunlight a day. They bloom in the middle of the Fall and stay strong until early Winter. Hibiscus plants in general are a nectar source for the Cloudless Sulphur, Orbed Sulphur, Disguised Scrub-Hairstreak, Yojoa Scrub-Hairstreak, Dukes Skipper, Large Orange Sulphur, White Angled-Sulphur, Yellow Angled-Sulphur, and Monk butterflies, and larval hosts for the Bumelia Webworm and Pearly Wood-nymph moths, and the Cloudless Sulphur butterfly.USDA Hardiness Zones 9b to 11








Hibiscus syriacus Snow Drift | White Rose of Sharon | Shrub Althea


Here I am offering Seeds from Hibiscus syriacus Snow Drift, also known as White Rose of Sharon, and Shrub Althea. Hibiscus syriacus Snowdrift can grow up to about 10 feet tall and likes to live in the sun or partial shade. These gorgeous blossoms show up in the middle of the Summer and stick around until early Fall. Hibiscus plants in general are a nectar source for the Cloudless Sulphur, Orbed Sulphur, Disguised Scrub-Hairstreak, Yojoa Scrub-Hairstreak, Dukes Skipper, Large Orange Sulphur, White Angled-Sulphur, Yellow Angled-Sulphur, and Monk butterflies, and larval hosts for the Bumelia Webworm and Pearly Wood-nymph moths, and the Cloudless Sulphur butterfly. USDA Hardiness Zones 5 to 8

Hibiscus syriacus Snow Drift White Rose of Sharon Shrub Althea

Hibiscus syriacus Snow Drift White Rose of Sharon Shrub Althea

Hibiscus syriacus Snow Drift White Rose of Sharon Shrub Althea

Hibiscus syriacus Snow Drift White Rose of Sharon Shrub Althea
Hibiscus syriacus Snow Drift | White Rose of Sharon | Shrub Althea

18 Available Now

Here I am offering Seeds from Hibiscus syriacus Snow Drift, also known as White Rose of Sharon, and Shrub Althea. Hibiscus syriacus Snowdrift can grow up to about 10 feet tall and likes to live in the sun or partial shade. These gorgeous blossoms show up in the middle of the Summer and stick around until early Fall. The flowers, leaves and roots are edible and are normally found in salads or used as vegetables. The leaves can also be dried and used to make a tea. The younger the leaves aqnd flowers the more tender they are. The roots are fiberous and lacking much flavor, but if you know how to season things it can be delicious. Hibiscus plants in general are a nectar source for the Cloudless Sulphur, Orbed Sulphur, Disguised Scrub-Hairstreak, Yojoa Scrub-Hairstreak, Dukes Skipper, Large Orange Sulphur, White Angled-Sulphur, Yellow Angled-Sulphur, and Monk butterflies, and larval hosts for the Bumelia Webworm and Pearly Wood-nymph moths, and the Cloudless Sulphur butterfly. USDA Hardiness Zones 5 to 8








Hibiscus syriacus Violet Satin | Rose of Sharon


Hibiscus syriacus Violet Satin Rose of Sharon 1

Hibiscus syriacus Violet Satin Rose of Sharon 2

Hibiscus syriacus Violet Satin Rose of Sharon 3

Hibiscus syriacus Violet Satin Rose of Sharon 4

Hibiscus syriacus Violet Satin Rose of Sharon 5
Hibiscus syriacus Violet Satin | Rose of Sharon

9 Available Now

Here I am offering Seeds from Hibiscus syriacus Violet Satin, also known as Rose of Sharon, and Shrub Althea. This plant likes to live in full sun where it burst with gorgeous blossoms of lavender, blue, and violet from the middle of Summer until early Fall. The flowers, leaves and roots are edible and are normally found in salads or used as vegetables. The leaves can also be dried and used to make a tea. The younger the leaves and flowers the more tender they are. The roots are fiberous and lacking much flavor, but if you know how to season things it can be delicious. Hibiscus plants in general are a nectar source for the Cloudless Sulphur, Orbed Sulphur, Disguised Scrub-Hairstreak, Yojoa Scrub-Hairstreak, Dukes Skipper, Large Orange Sulphur, White Angled-Sulphur, Yellow Angled-Sulphur, and Monk butterflies, and larval hosts for the Bumelia Webworm and Pearly Wood-nymph moths, and the Cloudless Sulphur butterfly. USDA Hardiness Zones 5 to 8